RESCHEDULED Lifelines to Solitary: A Prison Correspondence Project
Mar
8
6:30 pm18:30

RESCHEDULED Lifelines to Solitary: A Prison Correspondence Project

  • Bradley Room, United Church on the Green

“Lifelines to Solitary: A Prison Correspondence Project” by Marlies Talay, Project Coordinator at Solitary Watch and Johnny Perez, re-entry advocate and survivor of solitary confinement. Marlies and Johnny will give a presentation about the Lifelines correspondence program, specifically designed to reach out to people in solitary confinement.

 

 

        

Rebellious Lawyering Conference
Feb
17
Feb 18

Rebellious Lawyering Conference

  • Yale Law School

Rebellious Lawyering Conference at Yale Law School, including an event on the recently released Liman Center report, Reducing Time-in-cell. 

Register for RebLaw here.   The conference is free for residents of New Haven.

Commissioner Scott Semple, "What Does a Progressive Prison System Look Like?"
Feb
16
4:10 pm16:10

Commissioner Scott Semple, "What Does a Progressive Prison System Look Like?"

  • Room 129 Yale Law School

Scott Semple is the Connecticut Commissioner of Corrections.  Before that, he served as the deputy commissioner for operations and rehabilitative services.Semple started as a correction officer at the Cheshire Correctional Institution in 1988. He held a variety of positions before being promoted to warden at Garner Correctional Institution in Newtown, which houses criminals with severe mental health problems. He served there for four years before becoming deputy commissioner.

Film Screening of "Solitary" & Discussion with Director
Feb
13
6:10 pm18:10

Film Screening of "Solitary" & Discussion with Director

  • Rm 127, Yale Law School

Screening of documentary film, “Solitary,” followed by a panel discussion with: film director Kristi Jacobson; A. T. Wall, Director of Rhode Island Prison System; and Reginald Dwayne Betts, Liman fellow and award winning poet and author. Moderated by Judith Resnik, Arthur Liman Professor of Law, Yale Law School. 

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion
Feb
12
6:30 pm18:30

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion

  • Bradley Room, United Church on the Green

The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States...” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis. A trailer for the film can be found here.

About Ava DuVernay: 

Nominated for two Academy Awards and four Golden Globes, writer/director Ava DuVernay's most recent feature "Selma" was one of 2015's most critically-acclaimed films. Winner of the 2012 Sundance Film Festival's Best Director Prize for her feature "Middle of Nowhere," DuVernay's earlier directorial work includes "I Will Follow," "Venus Vs," and "This is The Life." In Fall of 2016, her first television series as executive producer, writer and director, "Queen Sugar," debuted on Oprah Winfrey's network, OWN.  DuVernay distributes and amplifies the work of other people of color and women directors through her film collective ARRAY, named one of Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies in Hollywood for 2016.

 

Book Talk: "23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement"
Feb
10
12:10 pm12:10

Book Talk: "23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement"

  • Faculty Lounge, Yale Law School

Originally meant to be brief and exceptional, solitary confinement in U.S. prisons has become long-term and common. Prisoners in solitary spend twenty-three hours a day in featureless cells, with no visitors or human contact for years on end. They are held entirely at administrators' discretion, with no judges or juries involved. In 23/7, legal scholar Keramet Reiter tells the history of an original "supermax," California's Pelican Bay State Prison, where extreme conditions sparked statewide hunger strikes in 2011 and 2013—the latter involving nearly 30,000 prisoners. Reiter describes how the Pelican Bay prison was created—with literally no legislative oversight—as a panicked response to the perceived rise of black radicalism in California prisons in the 1970s. Through stories of gang bosses, small-time parolees, and others, she portrays the arbitrary manner in which prisoners are chosen for solitary confinement, held for years, and routinely released directly onto the streets. Here we see the social costs and mental havoc of years in isolation. The product of fifteen years of research in and about prisons, this book is instant required reading on a topic that increasingly commands national attention.

Bio: Keramet Reiter, an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and at the School of Law at the University of California, Irvine, has worked as an associate at Human Rights Watch, and has testified about the impacts of solitary confinement before state and federal legislators. 

“HALTing Solitary Confinement: the Importance of Legislation to End Torture”
Feb
7
7:00 pm19:00

“HALTing Solitary Confinement: the Importance of Legislation to End Torture”

  • Dwight Hall Chapel, Old Campus, Yale University

“HALTing Solitary Confinement: the Importance of Legislation to End Torture” by Five Mualimm-ak, Incarcerated Nation Corp, human rights and mental health advocate, core member of the NY CAIC (Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated Confinement) working to pass the HALT solitary confinement act in New York State.  Five spent years in several forms of solitary confinement during his incarceration and is now an integral member of national legislative groups and coalitions working to end the practice.

Public Briefing on Solitary Confinement
Feb
7
10:00 am10:00

Public Briefing on Solitary Confinement

  • Old Judiciary Room, Capitol Building

Public Briefing on Solitary Confinement by the Connecticut Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. [Old Judiciary Room, Capitol Building, Hartford, Connecticut]

Judy Dworin Performance Project "Outside In"
Feb
2
6:30 pm18:30

Judy Dworin Performance Project "Outside In"

  • New Haven Free Public Library, Ives Memorial Library

"Outside In: Selections from Brave in a New World and In My Shoes"

In a powerful and moving mix of narrative, song and dance, Judy Dworin Performance Project (JDPP) performs pieces that bring key issues of incarceration to the stage. Performed by members of JDPP’s Ensemble and guest artists that have, at one point, spent time in prison, this provocative and authentic work brings to light the experience of incarceration and the challenges of coming back home.

Discussion with Judy Dworin and performers to follow.

Documentary Screening: "Worst of the Worst" & Panel Discussion
Feb
1
6:00 pm18:00

Documentary Screening: "Worst of the Worst" & Panel Discussion

  • New Haven Free Public Library, Ives Memorial Library

Screening of the documentary “The Worst of the WorstPortrait of a Supermax Prison", Yale Visual Law Project (2012)Panel discussion to follow with solitary survivors Keishar Tucker, Yasser Cruz and survivors’ family members.  Moderated by Steve Lance and Sameer Jaywant, Yale Law School.

Location: Ives Community Program Room, New Haven Free Public Library (Ives Memorial Library), 133 Elm Street, New Haven.

Co-sponsored by The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven

Opening Press Conference
Jan
30
1:30 pm13:30

Opening Press Conference

  • New Haven Free Public Library, Ives Memorial Library

Opening Press Conference with Mayor Toni Harp; William Ginsberg, The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven; Keishar Tucker, solitary survivor; Steve Lance and Sameer Jaywant, Yale Law School; State Senator Gary Winfield; Martha Brogan, City Librarian.